Aaron Bray

Aaron Bray

Staff R&D Engineer

Mr. Bray is a Staff Researcher at Kitware. He joined Kitware in 2017 to conduct research in software architectures for modeling and simulation and apply these solutions to a wide variety of problems. Since joining Kitware, he has worked to launch Pulse Physiology Engine, a fork of the TATRC-funded computational physiology engine. It has been incorporated in commercial and government-funded products and programs.

At Kitware, Mr. Bray also works with the computer vision team to provide support for both software development and modeling and simulation needs. As an example, he has worked to develop a traffic simulation framework that can generate both normal and anomalous traffic track data.

Throughout his career, he has been the lead software developer for multiple projects funded by the Department of Defense related to modeling and simulation, spanning a variety of domains including: computational physiology, traffic patterns, weapon effects, and radar and missile defense systems. 

His responsibilities on these projects include : 

  • Working in CMake to develop software build systems that combine multiple source repositories. As project pull in functionality from different authors, developing a turnkey build system for applications and libraries allows researchers developing complex algorithms to take advantage of the most recent research.

  • Designing and leading the development of reusable and extensible architectures for encapsulating and testing the implementation of computational models. He has worked closely with researchers and application developers to optimize and integrate models into architectures that can be used in a variety of software environments.

  • Developing calculation frameworks for modularizing engineering physics codes. Providing interfaces for net-centric integration and service oriented architectures (SOA). Specializing in data modeling and implementation, distributed computing architectures, and application frameworks

  • Developing a real-time visualization components for capturing and graphically displaying simulation exercise data  in distributed network architectures (such as DDS and HLA).

Mr. Bray earned a B.S. in Computer Science with a minor in Earth and planetary sciences from Auburn University.